Arch of Dolabella and Silanus & Church of San Tommaso in Formis

"Arch of Dolabella and Silanus & Church of San Tommaso in Formis" submitted by RomeTour Editorial Team and last updated on Wednesday 6th July 2011

Arch of Dolabella and Silanus (Arco di Dolabella e Silano)

Originally Arch of Dolabella and Silanus (Arco di Dolabella e Silano) was one of the city entrances built in the walls protecting the city in Republican epoch and restored by Augustus. Dolabella and Silanus (10 A.D.) were the magistrates responsible for reconstruction of this gate which might bore the name Porta Celimontana.
Arch of Dolabella and Silanus (Arco di Dolabella e Silano), Via di San Paolo della Croce
In occasion of restoration of another monument, aqueduct of Nero, conducted by Septimius Severus and Caracalla, the Arch of Dolabella and Silanus was incorporated in the tract of the aqueduct. It survived till our days, while the constructions of which it ever made part did not. The external facade presents an inscription that is not very readable now and shows the names of the consuls of the year 10 AD P.Cornelius Dolabella and C.Giunius Silanus who by decree of the Senate gave out the work by contract and had it tested.

Church of San Tommaso in Formis (Chiesa di S.Tommaso in Formis)

Near by the Arch is a Church of San Tommaso in Formis (Chiesa di S.Tommaso in Formis), built in the 19th-11th centuries in Romanesque forms. By the moment it lost its original character, paintings representing the missions of the Trinitarians in eastern countries, marbles, lacunar ceiling, portico and a bell-tower. It is mostly noted for being a burial place of St John of Matha, founder of the Order of Trinitarians. The latter possessed a big hospital, which occupied the bigger part of Villa Celimontana starting from 1207.
Church of San Tommaso in Formis (Chiesa di S.Tommaso in Formis)
The Chiesa di S.Tommaso in Formis also belonged to them and was the general seat of the Order, created by St John of Matha and dedicated to the cult of Trinity and to redemption of slaves. They were picking alms and went to the Muslim countries to negotiate the freedom of the Christians closed in the prisons. Besides, the order was giving assistance to all the poor who needed help and offered them their hospital. Till the 1389 it was prosperous, but after a series of ups and downs was abandoned. The construction was demolished and the territory was adapted for the villa. Only two pieces remind about it: a marble Romanesque arch and a Gothic one.

In 1663 restoration works were implemented and the church was provided with a newfacade. In 1898 the church was given back to the Trinitari who reopened it tocult in 1926. The little seventeenth century little façade opens up in the middle with a portal surmounted by a triangular tympanum. The interior embodies a unique nave with afrescoed vault. On the altars one can find masterpiece by Sermoneta (1521-1580) dating back to C. XVI.

Address:
Arch of Dolabella and Silanus & Church of San Tommaso in Formis
Via di San Paolo della Croce
Church of San Tommaso in Formis is at No. 10 of Via di San Paolo della Croce
00184, Rome, Lazio, Italy
Zone: Rione Celio (Terme di Caracalla) (Roma centro)
Arch of Dolabella and Silanus & Church of San Tommaso in Formis is Shown By "Map K Zone" As "78"
Church Hour: The Church is open only for liturgical celebration. Masses: Holidays 10.30.
Church Contact: Telephone: +39 06 35420529

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