Palazzo & Piazza (Historic Buildings, Squares and Streets)

Via Garibaldi [Roman Latrine (Latrina romana) & Garibaldi Mausoleum (Mausoleo Ossario Garibaldino)]

The modern via Garibaldi connects the ancient via delle Fornaci and via di S.Pietro in Montorio, which was open by Pius IX in 1867. Via Garibaldi arrives till the piazza di S.Cosimato. Roman Latrine (Latrina romana) at Via Garibaldi When part of the supporting wall of the square opposite St. Pietro in Montorio collapsed in October of 1963, the ruins of an antique Roman...

Passeggiata Avenue of Gianicolo (Piazzale e Passeggiata del Gianicolo)

 E.Gallori at Passeggiata Avenue of Gianicolo (or Janiculum), Rome The square on the top of Gianicolo (or Janiculum) Hill and the avenue (passeggiata) going throughout all the Hill were realized in 1885-1887 on the territory of the ex Parco Corsini. Passeggiata del Gianicolo avenue was opened in 1880-84 on the top of the hill from Acqua Paola to S. Onofrio. In the redesign of the area Villa Lanti lost its gardens, but the casino is still...

Michelangelo House (Casa di Michelangelo)

Michelangelo House (Casa di Michelangelo) This is a reconstruction of the house named after Michelangelo in via delle Tre Pile, destroyed in 1874 in course of works over the access to Capitolium. In those times it was the property of Pellegrini, who sold it to the Commune. The house was brought to the Gianicolo (or Janiculum) in 1941. It should not be mistaken with the other one in via Macel de'Corvi, where...

Villa Aurelia - American Academy in Rome

entrance to the Villa Aurelia, rome The villa was built for the cardinal Gerolamo Farnese in 17th century (pictured above: entrance to the villa) atop the Gianicolo (or Janiculum) hill, along the Aurelian walls close to Porta San Pancrazio. The property had belonged to Pope Paolo III as part of the Farnese family vineyards. From Farnese it came into possession of Borbone of Naples, then to Giraud in 1775, in...

Fountain of Ponte Sisto/ Acqua Paola (Fontana dell'Acqua Paola)

Fountain of Ponte Sisto/ Acqua Paola (Fontana dell'Acqua Paola) The fountain of the Acqua Paola (Fontana dell'Acqua Paola) was constructed for Paul V, by G.Fontana and F.Ponzio in 1612, using marble from the Nerva Forum. The water, which flows from the subterranean Aqueduct of Trajan (fed by springs near lake Bracciano, about 50 km northwest of Rome), falls into a large granite basin added by C.Fontana in 1690, beneath six columns (four of...

San Pancrazio Gate (Porta) In The Janiculum

San Pancrazio Gate (Porta) In The Janiculum This gate stands on the highest point of Janiculum Hill and takes the name from the near by basilica of S.Pancrazio. It was built by Urban VIII, and rebuilt by V.Vespignani in 1857 after the decisive battle here between the French forces and Garibaldi in 1849. This gate, once known as the Porta Aurelia was the starting-point of the Via Aurelia which is atop the Gianicolo (or...

Via Aurelia Antica

This road begins from the Porta S.Pancrazio and leads to the basilica of the same saint. The ancient road joins with the new Via Aurelia in the place called Valcannuta. The church of S.Pancrazio was erected for the pope S.Simmaco (498-514), on the cemetery site of the catacombs to honour the tomb of the young martyr Pancrazio. Next to the basilica was built the hospice for...

Sangallo Medici Clarelli Palace (Palazzo)

Next building after the church of S.Giovanni dei Fiorentini is a palace, which A.da Sangallo built for himself in times when Leo X gave an impulse to embellish this part of the Via Julia. Later the palace passed to Cosimo de'Medici who decorated it with the paintings glorifying his family and established here the Consulate of Tuscany; then the building was a property of...

Palazzo Sacchetti

Palazzo Sacchetti Next after Sangallo Medici Clarelli Palace (Palazzo) is Palazzo Sacchetti. There are some difficulties in attribution of this building; even thought the memorial tablet speaks about Sangallo. Probably he built the part of the palace, but the cardinal Giovanni Ricci da Montepulciano, having bought it in 1552, provided its new design and dimensions (architect Nanni di Baccio...

Palazzo dei Tribunali (Palace of Tribunals) Now Hotel St. George Roma

Via Giulia, an evocative XVIth century street great street desired by Pope Giulio II, who gave it its name. It was born from the dream of Pope Julius II and from Bramante's genius who, in 1508, begins his project for the magnificent "Palazzo dei Tribunali" an imposing courthouse that are only the remnents of a few stone seats, called the famous “sofas” of Via Giulia remains...

Via Giulia

It was the first and the longest streets of Rome built as a rectilinear tract. It is nearly one kilometer long, and was laid out by Bramante in the beginning of the 16th century for the order of pope Julius II, who gave it his name. Practically it had to be straighten already existed street Magistralis, so Bramate had to demolished numerous constructions on its way. The pope...

Palazzo Falconieri - Hungarian Academy

The palace was built in the 16th century for the Farnese family, but in 1638 it was bought by Orazio Falconieri and transformed a lot by Borromini. Between 1646 and 1649 Orazio Falconieri commissioned Borromini to enlarge the building by adding on the right of the main facade a blind, symmetrical and similar entrance to the original one on the left, and surmounted by a falcon...

Via Monserrato

Via Monserrato The street's name derives from the 16th century church Chiesa della Madonna di Montserrat (from famous Spanish sanctuary) which was located here. Before it was named Via di Corte Savella because of the presence of a tribunal and jails managed by the baron Savella family. But in the very beginning it bore the name of via Arenula e Regula or Recta, a generic name that had been...

Palazzo Ricci

Two facades of the palace facing the square in front of it have an extraordinary characteristics: they are covered by the paintings by P.da Caravaggio executed before 1525. The paintings, nearly not visible now, were re-depicted in th 19th century; they were dedicated to some Roman stories. The other similar paintings were in the courtyard, where are still conserved the...

Palazzo Fioravanti

Palazzo Fioravanti The palace was built in the 16th century by a jurisconsult Antonio Massa di Gallese, later it passed to the Fioravanti family, then to the Cadilhacs and others. The greatest part of the novel of Aldo Palazzeschi "Rome" was set in this palace. The design of the window pediments of Palazzo Farnese (alternately triangular or curved) set a pattern which was followed in Palazzo...